Stop Putting Cheeseburgers on People’s Heads

When you browse on Youtube, you’ll see videos of kids trying to get famous by yelling dumb shit in libraries. You’ll see pranksters putting cheeseburgers on people’s heads.  When you open up CNN and think you can escape from all of that, you might actually get lucky and see Kim Kardashian’s ass on the front-page. 

I know that there’s a place for entertainment but I’m really scared about the direction we’re headed. We are showing the new generations, that it’s OK to be complete dumbass and embrace anti-intellectualism. In fact, grab your camera, count to 100,000 on a live-stream, and you’ll probably make a bunch of money.

I’m all for creativity and putting yourself out there even when it feels scary. Become better at your craft and work on it every day. Create things that make people think. Inspire people. Change lives. Create value and blow people away with your usefulness.

If you are able to live this way, you’ll leave this world a little better than you found it.

How to Make a Living Doing Something You Care About with Kevin Kelly of Wired

Kevin Kelly is most known for co-founding Wired in 1993. He has written a lot of great books, cofounded all Species Foundation, a non-profit aimed at identifying every living species on Earth as well as Rosetta Project, which is building an archive of all documented human languages.

Some questions I ask:

  • Is it possible to make a living from every single niche out there?
  • How to build up 1,000 true fans?
  • How many “true fans” Wired magazine has?
  • What’s the future of online businesses?
  • What advice would you give to people who want to start an online hustle?

Things we talk about:

  • 1000 true fans theory
  • Strategies and tactics that were used in the beginning to grow Wired magazine
  • Getting a job versus taking an alternative path such as traveling the world
  • The importance of taking time off and embracing the slack 
  • Being content with losing it all
  • Advice on starting an online hustle

Links & resources mentioned in the episode

Bootstrapping a PR platform to 5,000+ customers with Dmitry Dragilev of JustReachOut

Dmitry Dragilev is the founder of JustReachOut.io, a PR platform that helps 5,000+ small businesses and startups (as well as big ones such as Airbnb, HubSpot, Chess.com, Nickelodeon) to pitch relevant journalists and get press coverage.

In this interview, Dmitry is incredibly honest and transparent about his whole journey and lessons he had to learn the hard way. I really think you’re going to enjoy this!

Some questions I ask:

  • How did you get interested in PR in the first place?
  • After building the product, how did you get your first customers?
  • Tell us about the time when you worked as marketer at Solar and grew it from 0 to 40 million page-views a month?
  • How do you deal with loneliness as an entrepreneur?

Things we talk about:

  • Leaving your ego behind and realizing that you don’t know it all
  • Coming up with the business idea for Just Reach Out
  • Going from charging $5/mo to $695/mo
  • Struggles and challenges with developing a SaaS product
  • Selling your tech product on a “deal” type of site
  • Dealing with loneliness as an entrepreneur

Links & resources mentioned in the episode

This podcast episode was produced by Oscar Hamilton.

Building a $1 Million Business with Jesse Patel of WorkFlowy

Jesse Patel is the cofounder of WorkFlowy, a simple organizational tool that helps you create lists to stay on top of your daily tasks. WorkFlowy has more than 200,000 active users and it’s bringing in close to $1,000,000 a year in revenue.

We covered a lot in this interview, including challenges with his cofounder Mike, competing with the giants and staying productive day-to-day.

Some questions I ask:

  • Why did you decide to build WorkFlowy in the first place?
  • How much attention do you pay to copycats and your competition?
  • Is it sensible to start a company without a co-founder?
  • What’s the recipe for a good cofounder relationship?
  • Tell me how does your typical workday look like?

Things we talk about:

  • Biggest lessons from being at Y Combinator
  • Ditching an idea to work on WorkFlowy
  • Going from 0 to 200,000 monthly active users
  • Why most internet businesses fail and never get traction
  • Productivity and getting stuff done

Links & resources mentioned in the episode

This podcast episode was produced by Oscar Hamilton.

Helping Non-Designers Create Online Graphics with Christopher Gimmer of Snappa

Christopher Gimmer is the founder of Snappa, a SaaS app that helps non-designers create online graphics. Snappa has 3,500+ paying customers while bringing in $500,000+ in annual recurring revenue. In this interview we talk how to market anything with a limited budget, advice for people who are looking to find the next big idea, productivity and much more.

Some questions I ask:

  • How did you validate your initial business idea?
  • What were the first steps you took to get Snappa off the ground?
  • What were the biggest lessons building a SaaS product as a non-developer?
  • How did you score a partnership with LeadPages?
  • Walk me through your recent work-day

Things we talk about:

  • Building a side-hustle on the side of your main business
  • Competition amongst free stock photo sites
  • Partnerships with big companies
  • Importance of social proof
  • Cash flow over innovation
  • Productivity & work ethic

Links & resources mentioned in the episode

This podcast episode was produced by Oscar Hamilton.

Succeeding In a Crowded Market with Dinesh Agarwal of RecurPost

Dinesh Agarwal is the founder of RecurPost, a social media scheduling and post recycling tool. Even though there is a lot of competition in the space, find out how Dinesh used it to his advantage.

Some questions I ask:

  • What were the first steps you took to get RecurPost off the ground?
  • How did you get your first users?
  • What have been the biggest challenges you’ve had to overcome?
  • Why did you decide to have a physical office over remote?
  • How does your typical workday look like?

Things we talk about:

  • A creative way to validate your idea
  • How to make sure your building the right features for your product in the beginning
  • Challenges with building a product top of other platforms
  • Marketing your business with a small budget
  • How to run a productive team

Links & resources mentioned in the episode

Helping People Create Their Own Netflix with PJ Taei of UScreen

PJ Taei is the founder of UScreen, a video platform that lets people launch their own streaming service. UScreen is serving more than 1000 customers including ToysRus, Wanderlust, and Zumba. Find out how PJ started this business and made it profitable.

Some questions I ask:

  • What were the first steps you took you get UScreen off the ground?
  • Should people learn how to code or outsource development?
  • How did you get your initial customers?
  • Is your success because of luck or grind?
  • How does your workday look like?
  • What advice would you give to people who want to start an online hustle?

Things we talk about:

  • Starting a hosting company before UScreen
  • Validating a business idea
  • Building a successful remote team
  • Productivity and work ethic
  • Importance of your competition

Links & resources mentioned in the episode

  • UScreen
  • Book recommended: ReWork by Jason Fried and David Heinemeier Hansson

Successfully Scaling a Two Sided Market Place with John Doherty of Credo

John Doherty is the founder of Credo, a service that connects businesses with vetted agencies and consultants. It all got started in 2013, and with just two years, John was able to take it full-time. The business is currently bringing in $25,000/mo.

Some questions I ask:

  • What was your content marketing strategy in the beginning?
  • How did you got your first 2-3 clients?
  • What have been the biggest challenges you’ve had to overcome with Credo?
  • Take me through your recent work-day
  • At what point did you realize you needed a mentor?

Things we talk about:

  • Getting your business off the ground with minimal resources
  • Challenges with multi-sided business
  • To hustle or not to hustle
  • Mentorship
  • Whether you need to be passionate about your niche or not

Links & resources mentioned in the episode

How to Grow Your Business One Customer at a Time with Turgay Birand of EditionGuard

Turgay Birand is the founder of EditionGuard, a web based service that protects your eBooks with so you don’t have to worry about piracy and unauthorized distribution. We cover a lot in this interview, including importance of saving money, loneliness as an entrepreneur and how to give your business a best chance of success.

Some questions I ask:

  • From all the failed ventures you had, what were the biggest learning lessons for you?
  • How did you find your content marketing team?
  • Whose advice to you listen to?
  • Are you planning to sell EditionGuard?
  • How important is passion when picking an idea?
  • What advice would you give to people who want to start an Online Hustle?

Things we talk about:

  • Trying to build Amazon of Turkey
  • Why you shouldn’t move to Silicon Valley
  • Importance of mentorship
  • Loneliness as an entrepreneur
  • When to quit and when to stick with your idea
  • Setting clear objectives and goals when acquiring new customers

Links & resources mentioned in the episode

Reviewing Site Builders For a Living with Steve Benjamins of Site Builder Report

Steve Benjamins is the founder of Site Builder Report, where he writes in-depth reviews about site builders and the business is making $40k/mo through affiliate sales. Learn how a failed venture started it all.

Some questions I ask:

  • How to know when to give up on an idea?
  • What was the first step you took to launch Site Builder Report?
  • Do you have to be passionate about the niche you go in?
  • How are you marketing your business?
  • How are you able to outcompete GoDaddy and Wix with some Google search terms?
  • What does your typical workday look like?

Things we talk about:

  • Lessons from building a failed website builder
  • Coming up with  the idea for the initial business
  • Tips on getting your online hustle off the ground as fast as possible
  • SEO advice
  • Why you should avoid advice from online communities
  • How to stay productive throughout the day

Links & resources mentioned in the episode